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20120925
20121003
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
in afghanistan and no evidence that the american plan to hand over to a credible, stable afghan government will work. these village elders tell me once u.s. troops leave, a civil war will begin and u.s.-trained afghan forces will not be able to stop it. >> are you preparing for this fight? are you already stockpiling weapons and ammunition and getting yourself ready? yes, we are, we will definitely fight, he says. and what about the afghan government? it's meaningless here, they say. you think it's possible that the taliban will try and come back. yes, they will, he says. it makes a decade's work of american battles seem futile. it wasn't always like this. >> the united states military has begun strikes. >> at first, the war had momentum. and a clear purpose. al qaeda with bases in afghanistan attack the united states on 9/11. just three months later, the u.s. drove the taliban from power, al qaeda and osama bin laden were on the run. it was done with a few hundred cia officers, special forces, and air power. a quick victory. but not decisive. >> that was nbc's richard engel reporting. and
. >> 47% of the people who vote for the president no matter what. who are dependent upon government, who believe they are victims, who believe the government has the responsibility to care for them, who believe they are entitled to health care, food, housing, you name it. and they will vote for this president no matter what. and so my job is not to worry about those. i'll never convince them they should take personal responsibility. >> top of the hour a live look at the white house on a rainy friday morning in washington. welcome back to "morning joe." we're here in washington. sam is still with us along with mark halperin up in new york and joining the table here in d.c. we've got a great group. former -- my professor? >> your professor. >> am i a good student professor gingrich? >> much better than me. you were my favorite student. >> wow. >> former white house secretary under president clinton and contributing editor to "vanity fair" dee dee myers is with us as well. okay. >> we just have a fascinating conversation. the contents of which we won't say completely on the air. >> oh. >> b
, there are a lot of small-government conservatives that don't think we should be spending over $2 billion a week in afghanistan, who don't think the president should have tripled down the number of troops when he had a chance to pull back and bring those troops home. a lot of conservatives believe that. i think this is a missed opportunity. >> well, and foreign policy clearly is going to be an area where mitt romney will want to make a turn in terms of the narrative of the campaign. one other issue that is now coming into the forefront is the benghazi attack and news over the weekend that the four americans including the u.s. ambassador there who were killed according to politico, romney advisers are now split over how broadly they should hit the president over his handling of that attack. and why it took so long to acknowledge that it was an act of terrorism. while some romney advisers argue they should keep their focus on the economy, politico says plans are in the works for mitt romney to deliver a major foreign policy speech shortly after wednesday's debate. what do you think of that? you th
it better early on but you do need to be careful. in some ways it's stating the obvious. government has a role. they have infrastructure, education, we all need that to perform our jobs, our start-up businesses, whatever. but, you know, is it going the next step and saying, well, you know, no matter how successful you are we're going to take some of it. that's what people were hearing. that's where the president needs to be careful. i do think that that theme did resonate. >> you could imagine, you're a person of -- a perfect person to channel this. you can imagine a very effective conservative -- republican message that was also kind of antiwall street? >> yeah. i wish we did. >> yes. exactly. >> i'm not into wall street. independent of wall street. >> the question is why has -- >> that's one of the great mysteries. i think this is where right and left should agree. i think this is not ideological. these guys are still threats to our financial system. they should stand on their own two feet. taxpayers shouldn't have to bail them out. that's a good conservative principal or progressive
, but the takeaway is that this government is still strong in and around the capital. >> we have been reporting in the last 18 or so months what is the number, 28,000 syrians have been killed during this civil war, since last march. we have shown the pictures from aleppo and places like that. then you talk to the women, getting manicures, in the capital city of damascus, who aren't necessarily pro assad, who aren't necessarily pro rebel, stuck in the middle. here is that they told you. >> on many days the death toll around the capital far higher than for other cities. but where they can, people are trying to hold on to their old lives. for this woman, that's a few minutes at the beauty salon. it may look like normal life, but it is not. >> every day we hearing this boom, boom. and everything else. and there is a lot going on. >> you don't worry about it? >> i worry. i worry sick about it, but nothing we can do. >> reporter: she tells me she hates the killing, supports neither government nor rebels. wants them to talk, feels stuck in the middle. so too the salon's owner. >> i cannot go to the co
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)